National study provides insights into childhood head injuries

This week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine features an article that highlights an unprecedented analysis of the nation’s childhood head injuries. The study, authored by physicians at UC Davis School of Medicine and Washington University School of Medicine, analyzed more than 43,000 children who were evaluated for head trauma at 25 emergency departments around the United States.

Head injuries can make children loners

This is a preliminary study but we want to go into more of the details about why working memory and processing speed are associated with social functioning and how specific brain structures might be related to improve outcome.

How a Concussion Can Lead to Depression Years Later

The findings could help explain some of the midlife mental-health issues suffered by individuals who experience multiple concussions as young adults, researchers say. And these depressive symptoms are likely inflammation-related, which means they may not respond to common antidepressants.

From football to flies: lessons about traumatic brain injury

“These exciting findings that we can study traumatic brain injury — a disorder of growing concern for athletes, the military, and parents — in the elegantly simple model of fruit flies is sure to interest those researchers and companies looking to address this concern,” says Jennifer Gottwald, WARF licensing manager. “The use of this model can accelerate the work of the medical research community in finding treatments and therapies to help patients.”

Cooling may prevent trauma-induced epilepsy

"Traumatic head injury is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy in young adults, and in many cases the seizures cant be controlled with medication," says senior author Matthew Smyth, MD, associate professor of neurological surgery and of pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "If we can confirm coolings effectiveness in human trials, this approach may give us a safe and relatively simple way to prevent epilepsy in these patients."